Well, Would Ya Look at That…

It seems the coconut doesn’t fall too far from the tree.  Not that my sister actually fell from my tree, but you know what I mean.  Anyway, here is a preview of the upcoming anthology, “From Their Cradle to Your Grave.”  My sister Dana Priebe has a short in here called “Afterbirth” and let me tell ya, it’s a doozy.

Sweet, huh?  Should be out by the end of this month from Cruentus Libri Press.

Now, I’m off to work.  Stop bothering me.

-Kim

Interview with Horror Author Rebecca Besser

This week I interviewed the lovely Rebecca Besser.

Isn’t she cute?  Here’s what she had to say about her inspiration, writing process, and upcoming work…

1.     What would you say was the defining influence (author/book/movie/family member, etc.) that pointed you toward horror?

 

Experimentation. I force myself to try things I haven’t tried before, or am leery of. When I stared writing a few years ago, I was nervous about writing in first person, so I forced myself to try it only to find out that it wasn’t so bad. After that, I was determined to try various genres – horror seemed to be a good fit for me and it stuck! LOL I still write other things, but not as often.

 

2.     What was your inspiration for Nurse Blood?

 

Justin T. Coons’ amazing art! The cover art inspired the story.

 

3.     What is your gory main character, Sonya Garret’s favorite tool of the organ-harvesting trade and why?

 

Graphic representation of the live organ harvests

Graphic representation of the live organ harvests (Photo credit: longtrekhome)

 

She uses a surgical scalpel a couple times to inflict harm in the book, so I’ll have to go with that. When harvesting human parts, nothing comes in as handy as a small, very sharp knife. 😉

 

4.     I love the polarity of healer vs. killer.  Do you think that your MC is more evil than your average serial killer because she is a person charged with the care of others when they are at their most vulnerable yet she abuses that power?

 

I don’t know that I would call her evil. I see her as being broken inside… She’s dealt with a lot in life, but she’s still strong and willing to make her own path no matter what other people think of it. What she chooses may not be right, but it’s what she wants it to be. I guess she’s strong with a warped moral compass. LOL

 

5.     Do you have any inspirational music for your writing?  Any favorite artists to get you in the murderous mood?

 

Not really. Mostly I prefer silence. I think this is because once I get into a story, I block everything else out. I’m in my zone, so to speak, and very little gets in.

 

6.     I know you edit as well as write.  Do you find it difficult to step back and forth between the two roles?  Is it tough to refrain from changing an author’s voice while editing, or can you easily distance yourself while editing others’ work?

 

It’s complicated. I find I have the hardest time editing work by people from other countries. I get accused of ‘Americanizing’ it. Some hate it, while others don’t mind. I do tend to warn them at the beginning though, and I try to only make changes that will strengthen others work. I also try to be somewhat flexible when working with others, because, at the end of the day, it still represents them.

 

7.     What is your favorite writing project you’ve worked on so far?  Favorite editing project?

 

My favorite project would probably be Nurse Blood; it was really fun. My favorite editing project would probably be Earth’s End; it was a struggle, but ended well. 🙂

 

8.     What genres besides horror do you dabble in?  Do common subgenres or themes frequently sneak into your work?

 

Supernatural. I tend to write about the Devil.

 

9.     What is in your bug out bag, Rebecca?  How about five must-have survival tools and one luxury item?  Feel free to explain your choices.

 

Gun, ammo, matches, survival/herb book,   water, and luxury item…hmmm…hair brush!

 

10.   What new projects/books/stories are you immersed in currently?  Pimp ‘em, sister!

 

I’m finalizing Nurse Blood and starting on my zombie novel series: The Hunger Plague. I also have a few short stories in the works. 😀

Sounds great!  Thanks so much for taking the time to visit my blog, Rebecca!  I look forward to checking our your work!

You can find Rebecca Besser on Facebook here.  And check out her website @ www.rebeccabesser.com or her blog: blog.rebeccabesser.com

-Kim

Procrastination: Writing Excuses 101

1. My dog ate my computer.


Oh, wait.  I don’t have a dog.  But if I did, I’d want this one.  At least he’d only eat my maple bacon and cat treats.

2. I just need to jump on Facebook/Twitter and/or check my email (for the next 2 hours).

3. I’m not sure what to do with this scene/I’m waiting for the characters to tell me what happens next/I’m waiting for an epiphany in the form of a blow to the head or a lightning strike.  How about a kick in the ass?

4. I need to wash my hair.

5. I need to wash the dishes (I know I’m grasping at straws when I use this one).

6. I’m just not in the zombie/cannibal/demon/vampire/insert anything writing mood.  Maybe I will be tomorrow.  Actually, if I sit down and start, I’ll get in the writing mood.  That’s how it works, and I know this.

7. I just need to watch a few videos on You Tube to get inspired first (six hours later…).

8. Another project takes precedence (and so I work on neither one).

9. I have to write a blog today.  Therefore, I can’t work on my current project.  Add any of the aforementioned excuses to this one to find out why the blog doesn’t get written either.

10. I’m exhausted from being the Games Master at Bible camp all week. And, no, they aren’t Hunger Games.

11.  I find it impossible to concentrate with 3 kids running around and asking for snacks/toys/or, as is the case right this second “Mom, where are my arms?” because they are pulled into the small kid’s sleeves.  These interruptions occur approximately five billion times a day during summer break.  I need a break from summer break.

12.  This nervous twitch in my eyelid whenever I stare at the computer for any length of time is stopping me from writing.  I mean really, what the heck?  It’s been like five days!  Maybe I should write a short about a killer nervous twitch.

And now for a quick pep talk to inspire me to get some writing done tonight…

Come on, you lazy puke–you’re not tired!  Eye twitches are kinda fun anyway!  You hate dishes, and besides the dishwasher is running right now.

Put those kids to bed and write, damn it!

Or maybe fall asleep on the couch watching a chick flick…It might generate some great ideas…

I Ran Over Your Dog–A Poem

I ran over your dog.

It was the rat-like thing with the cow spots and the bone-jarring yap, right?

I didn’t mean to.

It just jumped out at me and I feared for my fender.

I tried to swerve

to hit it head on and make it quick

and painless

and less barky.

I’m sorry.

I promise to scoop it up

instead of just leaving it there for the beetles to attend to.

Or someone to step in.

I am a responsible pet-killer.

Let this not be an awkward hurdle

in our occasional, convivial tète-à-tètes.

I still want to be the closest of acquaintances.

I look forward to meeting your new dog!

****

I offer this in honor of poetry week in my son’s class.  It’s no Jabberwocky, I’ll grant you, but nothing is.  Mind, no dogs were actually killed in the writing of this poem, so stuff your canine-loving hate mail in another inbox.  :0)

Protecting Yourself as a Writer

As this stinky business with Undead Press, Anthony Giangregorio, and any other publishing entities the man uses, blows up all over writerly facebook pages and blogs everywhere, I thought I’d post my thoughts on the issue.

For those not aware of what I’m talking about, her is Mandy DeGeit’s original post that is going viral as I type.  I think I commented last night, when there were about 30 other comments.  Now my inbox has accumulated each subsequent comment to the tune of 400 and counting.  It’s like she made the Freshly Pressed pages here at good old WordPress.  The girl had a crappola thing happen to her, but all the buzz is a sweet turnaround, so the story may indeed have a happy ending.

Anyway, read her post.  Cringe along with everyone else.  And then ask yourself, “How do I, as a fledgling author, keep buggery like that from happening to me?”

The allure of thy name in print is strong.  So powerful, in fact, that tons of would-be authors probably fall for scammy publishers every day.  Not all bad experiences make the viral radar, however.  So we need to arm ourselves here, people.  Together, if we refuse to work with these tumors, they will eventually shrivel up and die.  Because, let’s face it–they’re blood-sucking leeches who can’t sustain themselves with their own sub-par writing, so they climb on the backs of the innocent and naive.

I was fortunate enough to have the first piece of writing I ever sent out be picked up by a reputable (and professionally paying) publisher.  Had that not been the case, I can see where I might have undervalued my work; where I even might have been desperate enough to send weeks worth of work to a POS like Mr. Giangregorio for the chance to be published by ANYBODY in the world.  His shtick, you’re not good enough for publication, but I’m going to do it anyway, could look like a golden opportunity for a newbie, and one might easily overlook the fine print.

So what’s an author to do?  Well, first of all, knowledge is power.  Know the web sites that post reviews of publishers and editors.  Predators and Editors is one.  Writer Beware is another.

Google is your friend.  Seedy publishers are not.

Talk to other writers and find out about their good and bad experiences.  Absolute Write is a fabulous site, chock-full of information and helpful people fighting the same fight you are.

Research, research, research.  You do it for your writing, so why wouldn’t you do it when seeking a potential publisher; when sending your baby out into the cruel world?

Another thing: Go with your gut.  If the website of a potential publisher looks like a child put it together, they obviously do not invest much time and effort into their “business.”  It stands to reason, they will invest even less time and effort into your writing.  You want your work in a well-put-together and attractive package that you won’t be embarrassed to show to friends and family.

If a pub’s website looks like this, odds are your book will look like shit, too, even if they don’t butcher your hard work before printing it.  I landed on Open Casket Press’ site while floating around the ether investigating submission calls a while back.  It just so happens that Open Casket is another of  Giangregorio’s publishing ventures.  Well, I noticed the horrid web presence and out of morbid curiosity stuck around long enough to see what they were paying for a story.  Nada.  Zip.  Zilch.

And that is exactly what they think of your work.

Have more respect for yourself than that.

And, finally, we get to the contract.  If you submit, and your work is accepted, there will be a contract.  This is your legal bible.  Your authorial condom there to protect you from underhanded disease carriers.  Read it carefully.  Pull it out of the package and fill it with water.  If it leaks from countless different holes, toss that shit.  If you are unsure of what a “normal” contract looks like, or whether or not the people who want to print your story are royally screwing you over–ASK!  Just ask.  Jump on Absolute Write and post on the appropriate forum.  Guaranteed, you will have twenty responses in a day.  Don’t sign anything unless you know what you are getting yourself into.

At the end of the day, it is your story.  Your hard work, and no one is entitled to make money off of it and leave you high and dry without your say so.  Just say no, because odds are you won’t end up being an overnight sensation and gaining thousands of new blog followers by allowing your work to be defiled and your name to be jeopardized.

Odds are, all you’ll have to show for it are a bunch of overpriced books sitting in your basement and a very sore ass.

Writing For the Love (of Pete)

Today I was thinking about how I don’t really offer up the “I’m an author” line to many people.  Generally speaking, I keep it to myself unless it comes up.  I was wondering if I made a living writing (which I do not—I couldn’t feed my cat with money from my writing, let alone a family of five) would I be more inclined to pony-up the information? 

Not that I am ashamed of how I spend my free time.  Hell, I’d like to let people know that my house gets cleaned even less lately because I’m “working” in my free time.  This place isn’t a pig sty because I’m watching Vampire Diaries and eating bon-bons for the eight hours a week all three of my kids are in school. 

I don’t suppose I can call it work if I don’t really make any money doing it, can I?   

But it is work.  It’s a time-consuming job trying to crank out enough coherent words strung into sentences, glued into paragraphs and sandwiched together with a layer of literary bubblegum to create a short story.  Forget about the bigger projects I try to make time for.

When you think about the time spent simply daydreaming up an idea–which is usually during dinner or while your Lego master is explaining his latest creation, or while you are driving a bus of wild animals to choir practice—already you are looking at hours and hours spent on a short alone.  Again, a full novel takes weeks of thinking, planning, outlining, note-taking and people-watching before you even sit down at a computer.  Then you get there and realize you know nothing about the California Gold Rush and the research begins.  Think term papers without direct quotes, only on a major scale.

Have we started writing yet?  Maybe you are a fly-by-your-seat kinda author.  Cool.  I salute you.  That could save you a bundle of time.  Or it could burn you alive with re-writes once you get half way done and realize you have plot holes the size of Jupiter.  Me, I outline.  The carefree method that would seem to be my style superficially, just doesn’t pan out for me when I’m sifting for gold nuggets.  In California.  In 1851.  With the help of my time machine.  Just tying that back together.

Okay, so all of the homework completed, we move on to the writing part.  Now, I’m a fast typist, so essentially, this doesn’t take all that long provided I am not distracted by squirrels, or bon-bons, or laundry, or singing karaoke to Breaking Benjamin songs that are too R rated to play at full blast while the kids are home.  So let’s say I rein in my ADD for the time it takes me to hammer out a 5,000 word piece.

And then saunters in my arch enemy of the writing world—editing.  I’d like to punch this guy in the face, but I can’t.  He is the most important piece of the puzzle (or so he thinks, the conceited bastard).  Editing takes a number of days, if not weeks, and a number of reads. 

All the while, an equal number of hilarious squirrels are jumping around my lawn like little clowns, waving their bon-bons at me and flipping me off to the tune of Shallow Bay.  I ignore them.  I hope.  And I get it done.

Oh!  Lest we forget, I must check the submission guidelines and format my work to the specifications of my chosen market.  Busy work, but, like editing, a necessary evil.

Now, what was my chosen market again?  In all likelihood, especially for newer authors, the publisher may have a cute little sentence under the title PAYMENT.  It could very well, and very often does, read “For the Love.”

For the love of Pete.  This is why I cannot feel comfortable saying “I’m an author.”  Like, “I work from home.  I write.”  And I do.  But non-paying markets, or token payments, for—how much time did it take me?—they don’t add up to a living. 

Therefore, this is not my job.  It is my hobby (cringe).

Do I enjoy it?  Yes.  Do I love to see my name in print?  Absolutely.  Do I want to do it for free just to spread my creativity like an infection to the masses (or the few, as the case may be)?  No, I don’t.  I can blog for free to reach out and grab someone.  I can make pointless, but ultra-funny, nonsense flyers and staple them all over town in the middle of the night.

I loved working as an RN.  Would I go pull an eight-hour shift sans pay just because helping sick people is so rewarding?  Ah, no.  Florence Nightingale I ain’t.  And she probably got paid anyway.

So why is the “For the Love” trend so prevalent?  Could be the saturation of the market.  The name in print scenario I mentioned so enough people are willing to work for free, perpetuating the problem.  All the free e-books on Amazon from self-pubs and fledgling indie publishers that make people think that the written word shouldn’t cost a penny.  It’s possible. 

But these little anthologies that are just getting their foot in the publishing door could still offer a small royalty payment.  That way the authors are more vested in promoting the material.  The publishers don’t have to come up with up-front payment.  And the authors don’t have to feel like someone is bending them over and…I’ll keep it clean, but you know where I was going.

But when I spend more money than I earned to buy a copy or two of “my” book, it hurts my heart a little.  I end up paying more than I was paid.  That is essentially paying to have your work published, which is a number one no-no, as everyone knows.

Can I be one of those working writers?  Go get a day job like so many and write in my “spare” time?  Yup, and I just may one of these days if my Sugar Daddy gets tired of supporting my pipe dreams. 

Or I may decide that my massive amounts of time are better spent elsewhere and give up the authorial ghost.

I hope that day never comes, because as much as “For the Love” is a gang of rude squirrels defecating in my sandbox, I still love to write.  For now I’ll throw my bon-bons at them and power through. 

I don’t need the empty calories anyway.

Now if you’ll excuse me, I have a cannibalism story that needs to be written.  Twenty-five bucks and a zombie t-shirt riding on this one, baby.  Woo hoo!  They had me at zombie.  And again at t-shirt. 

Take that, you stupid squirrels!

My Interview with Author Noah Mullette-Gillman

Ding-dong the Merry o; I am an interview virgin no longer!

This past weekend I had the opportunity to interview author Noah Mullette-Gillman.  I had a lot of fun coming up with questions and Noah did not disappoint me with his thought-provoking answers.  So tie your plastic bibs around your necks, ladies and gentlemen, and read on to sample a small portion of Noah’s brain.  Mmmmm.  Brains.

1.       Did you always want to be an author?

Yes. But there were other things I wanted to be first. What I mean is, I imagined writing a novel to be such a huge and cerebral task that it would be something I would only be able to undertake when I was near the end of my life. I believed and knew it would be my most important work, but I thought it was a long way off.

In the meantime, I really wanted to be a rock and roll singer. Not much in life makes me as happy as standing up on stage and singing in front of an audience. I remember there was a time when I lived in Boston when I went years working in customer service. I didn’t have much money. I couldn’t think straight, and I was pretty much miserable. The parties didn’t cheer me up. I knew some wonderful women during that time, but they weren’t enough to keep me going.

It was getting up on stage for about 15 minutes every Sunday night at The Kells’ open mic with my band, and then reading poetry with a jazz band behind me at the Lizard Lounge on Monday nights that kept me waking up and going to work.

It was maybe a half-hour total every week when I really felt alive, but it was enough.

Of course, being in a band is tough. People argue. And some people start to get very strange when they can actually imagine their dreams really coming true, so my bands didn’t last and I had to find something else to make life worthwhile.

2.       How much of your writing is based on past experiences/people?  Give me an example (no need to use real names).

A friend of mine once commented that in each of my stories I seemed to be fighting against a different problem in my life. I wrote a cowboy zombie movie because I was terrified of zombies – absolutely phobic. Afterwards, I wasn’t quite so scared.

Luminous and Ominous was a quasi-autobiographical work. Just a few people in the book were 100% people who I know. I borrowed exact dialogue and scenes from real friends to create many of the characters, but most of them were not meant to actually be those people.

http://www.amazon.com/Luminous-Ominous-Noah-K-Mullette-Gillman/dp/1456387456/ref=pd_sim_sbs_b_2

For example, I visited my friends Andrew and Amanda. The scene in the book when Henry first visits his friends Barney and Samantha was heavily influenced by an afternoon I spent with them in their apartment. Some of the dialogue came right out of their mouths. But Andrew wasn’t meant to be Barney. Amanda wasn’t Samantha. The characters were very different from my friends. Some characters in the book borrowed pieces from more than one real person that I know. And I’m not Henry. Henry and I are actually very different people.

I spent about three years trying to write Magic Makes You Strange. I had the initial ideas in Los Angeles. Later, I wandered the streets of Prague trying to make the pieces all make sense and fit together. Originally, it would have featured a man and a woman who had a lot in common with me and one of my exes. Then I created Nevil Dever and Edward Whistman. These characters were so vivid and real to me that I didn’t have to make it a story simply about myself and my friends. Using magic as a metaphor for art, the narrative, the action, was so powerful that the story didn’t need me and it didn’t need my friends.

3.       How would you describe your writing style/tone of your stories to someone who hasn’t read you yet?

One of the reviewers for Magic Makes You Strange commented that this was the third one of my books she had read, and that the three of them couldn’t be more different. This is intentional. I feel the need, for the sake of professional pride, to reinvent the wheel every time I drive. The White Hairs really couldn’t be more different from Luminous and Ominous, and Magic Makes You Strange is again a new style. Yes, I hope I am growing as a writer, but I think the differences between these books are more a matter of choices that I’m making rather than limitations in my skill.

Some people have told me that they think Magic Makes You Strange is much better written than Luminous and Ominous. Some prefer the style of Luminous and Ominous. When I release a sequel to Luminous and Ominous, it will be in the style of the first book, not Magic Makes You Strange. It’s not that I’m changing, it’s that I’m doing different projects and approaching them in the way I feel fits.

Song writers are expected to write different songs and different albums in different styles. I don’t think authors should get it easier.

http://www.amazon.com/Brontosaurus-Pluto-Society-Magic-Strange/dp/1463770901/ref=ntt_at_ep_dpt_1#_

4. Do you like happy endings?  In your stories, that is?

In my stories?

Sometimes yes, sometimes no. There’s a place for happy endings. Certain kinds of stories demand them, but I am more concerned with what the ending of a story reveals.

I used to say that the difference between American movies and European movies was that the American movies ended when the story was done, while European movies ended when the portrait was complete. To an American, the European story can seem to climax too early.

5. Which of your books is your favorite and why?

No. I don’t have an honest answer for that. I’m especially proud of Luminous and Ominous because of the structure; both with the two timelines and also the interlocking duality of meaning all the way throughout. The construction, the geometry of it, impresses me more than the content of the book. It’s worth thinking about, and worth re-reading.

Many people tell me that The Confessions of Zeuspater is my best work, and I am very proud of it. A lot of research and serious thought went into the comparative mythology of that book. At times, I felt more like I was finding the connections, rather than being creative at all.

I think Magic Makes You Strange is the one with the most potential. If the number of readers justifies it, I’d love to write a whole mess of books in that universe. I’ve spent a lot of time and thought figuring that whole world out.

6. Do you ever write yourself into your book, whether it be little pieces of yourself into the main character, or an authorial walk-on role a-la Stephen King?  If so, which of your characters most closely resembles you?

Not directly. There’s never been a character who WAS Noah in one of my books, but they all have a part of me in them. I have a lot in common with Farshoul (from the White Hairs) or, I did at that time in my life. Henry and I (From Luminous and Ominous) are similar in a number of ways, but also very different. I’d like to think I’m a lot like the great and handsome Nevil Dever (From Magic Makes You Strange.) Maybe on my best days…

When I write, when I create a character, I do actually ask myself how my protagonist is different from me and I consider it a goal to make sure they are. I don’t think anyone is interested in just reading my fantasies and wish-fulfillment. I’m trying to be more interesting than that.

http://www.amazon.com/White-Hairs-Noah-K-Mullette-Gillman/dp/0557482844/ref=ntt_at_ep_dpt_5

7. In “Magic Makes You Strange” you do a significant amount of world-hopping/time travel, and your creepy antagonist in “Luminous and Ominous” is an extraterrestrial flora/fauna.  Is it safe to say you have a firm interest in space studies and sci-fi in general?  Any particular book or movie that really fueled that interest for you?

I’m usually not a fan of Physicist Neil Degrasse Tyson’s. I really do think that Pluto’s degrading from a planet to a dwarf planet was done on less than logical grounds, and really just as a publicity stunt. But I’ve seen him on TV lately arguing fervently about the real reasons why we had, why we no longer have, and why we need a real space program.

The first space program was there to compete with the Soviets. That’s why we dropped it immediately when the Soviet Union fell apart. It wasn’t intended to give us inventions, or something to believe in. Those were bonuses.

But when we have a space program, we have a culture of innovation. Why did electronics need to start miniaturizing? So we could fit them on a space shuttle. What effect does it have on a culture, when we all believe we’ll get to stand on the moon one day? I believed that when I was a kid. I no longer do. And look at how our culture has changed. America doesn’t do anything new or exciting now. When we dream about the future, we don’t dream of advancement and imagination, now we dream of how many ways the world can end.

In business they say that if you’re not growing you’re dying. We need to be a culture which is exploring, or we are a culture in decline. And I think right now we are a culture in decline.

http://www.amazon.com/Confessions-Zeuspater-Noah-K-Mullette-Gillman/dp/1468003771/ref=ntt_at_ep_dpt_6

8. You have a 100 word story in the newly released anthology “100 Horrors-Horror in the Blink of an Eye.”  What kind of gear-shifting did you need to do to go from a novelist, to a drabble writer?

It was an incredibly difficult task. I spent an evening sitting down watching horror movies, one after the other and writing multiple 100 word stories until I got one that I liked.

Imagine how hard it is to actually say something in so few words. Now make sure you have a story, you have some sort of movement and action. Make sure your 100 words starts in one place and ends in another. It was really hard, and a lot of fun!

9. I detect a lot of spirituality and mysticism in your books.  Explain how such concepts play an important role in your work/life.

I’m not religious, but I do and have spent a lot of time thinking about life. I have seen very strange things in my day. I have experienced the supernatural. I am the son of two Astrologers. When I was a boy, my mother ran a program out of our home called the “Pleroma Holistic Health Center.” Every month she would have a different guest speaker. One month it might be a past-life reader, the next a numerologist, the next a specialist on hand-writing, or a psychic. Some of them were more impressive than others. I was left with a higher impression of some of these disciplines than others. But it went a long way towards opening worlds for me. I think a lot of things are normal which seem outlandish to others.

My brother was too young, so I was the only child who would sit in on these events.

Like any writer, my understanding of what the world is influences my work. I remember reading 95% of Kim Stanley Robinson’s “Red Mars” before putting it down. I was maybe 10-20 pages from the end, but I decided I didn’t want to finish it. She offered a vision of what it would be like to live in an alien world completely devoid of anything spiritual or sublime or unexpected. Her view was apparently that our understanding of the universe would in no way be changed by terraforming a new world. It was utterly mundane. I found that laughably implausible. That was, to me, more ridiculous than aliens, ghosts, Gods, or time travelers, or the wondrous things we haven’t thought up yet.

10. If you were writing this interview, what question would you be dying to ask yourself?

Why are you so damn sexy?

11. If you could be an X-man, which one would you be (either actual, or one of your own creation)?

Nightcrawler was always my favorite.

Thanks for your time, Mr. Mullette-Gillman!  Keep on rockin’!

All in a day’s work, M’am

Find more about Noah Mullette-Gillman at these fine internet establishments:

 

www.luminousandominous.com

Twitter: @Noahlot

http://www.facebook.com/thewhitehairs